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Thread: World War Three Thread....

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    Default Re: World War Three Thread....

    Woah...


    Air Force Preparing B-52 Bombers For 24-Hour Alert Status, Official Says

    October 22, 2017

    The U.S. Air Force is preparing to place its fleet of nuclear-armed B-52 bombers on 24-hour alert for the first time since 1991 amid escalating tensions with North Korea, the military branch's chief of staff said in a report Sunday.

    Defense officials denied to Fox News that bombers were ordered to go on 24-hour alert, but Gen. David Goldfein told Defense One it could happen.

    “This is yet one more step in ensuring that we’re prepared,” Goldfein said. “I look at it more as not planning for any specific event, but more for the reality of the global situation we find ourselves in and how we ensure we’re prepared going forward.”

    Goldfein noted that in a world where “we’ve got folks that are talking openly about use of nuclear weapons,” it’s important to remain alert and think of new ways to be prepared.

    “It’s no longer a bipolar world where it’s just us and the Soviet Union. We’ve got other players out there who have nuclear capability. It’s never been more important to make sure that we get this mission right,” Goldfein added.

    Barksdale Air Force Base in Louisiana, home of the 2d Bomb Wing and Air Force Global Strike Command, which manages the service’s nuclear services, is being renovated, Defense One reported, so that B-52s would be ready to “take off at a moment’s notice.”

    The B-52, which can fly up to about 50,000 feet and at supersonic speeds, has the ability to release a variety of weapons, including cluster bombs, gravity bombs and precision guided missiles.

    The long-range bomber can also unleash both nuclear and precision-guided conventional ordnance.

    The 24-hour alert status for B-52s ended in 1991, in the waning days of the Cold War.

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    Default Re: World War Three Thread....

    Some expounding on the above by an ARFCOMmer I'd consider impeccable on the subject of nukes since he was heavily involved for his career:

    Originally Posted By limaxray:
    Originally Posted By USMCTanker:
    Agreed, but we can do both.

    I don't believe this is directed solely at NK. Russia has been upping it's game lately, and Iran is being put on notice.
    This is the only reason. Neither North Korea or Iran are enough of an existential threat to the US to start the MAJOR muscle movement of bringing back the alert birds (with the massive associated costs in manpower, resources, training, maintenance, and security). Alert ops tie up a LOT of planes, people and money to keep the airframes ready to fly at an acceptable availability rate (like, 90% or higher); even talking about it means someone's taking the Russian words and actions seriously.

    On another website, the comment on this article was "If Moscow wants to behave like it's still 1983, they shouldn't be surprised when we react accordingly."

    Here's something to consider--the only people left in the USAF who know how to do aircraft alert all have the first name of General. There's no corporate knowledge of how to do long term (more than the 7-10 day "alerts" during Global Shield) alert ops; everyone who does know are long retired, since it's been 26 years since Bush 41 stood the bombers down. So the USAF is going to have to reinvent the wheel on that...again.

    "Peace dividend," my ass. [!]
    Originally Posted By limaxray:
    How serious is this? Consider: in a world where for the last 17 years the #1 actual priority of the USAF has been to have every tail available to fly combat ops over IRQ/AFG (hush, Sylvan ) to the exclusion of the nuclear mission, AF leadership is now not just talking about, but actually making preparations for, having a sizeable % of the bomber force fenced off for the nuclear mission, and therefore unavailable for conventional operations anywhere else in the world.

    Oh, and bombers go exactly nowhere without gas, which is why about half the planes on alert were tankers, so those are off limits as well.

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    Default Re: World War Three Thread....


    US Fighter Jets Intercept Russian Nuclear Bombers Near North Korea

    November 2, 2017

    U.S. fighter jets intercepted Russian nuclear bombers approaching the aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan off the coast of North Korea on Sunday.

    Multiple U.S Navy F/A-18 jets were dispatched on Sunday to escort two Russian TU-95 bombers away from the ship currently stationed near North Korea and operating in the Sea of Japan, according to Navy officials who spoke with Military.com.

    The Russian bombers, capable of executing a nuclear strike, were intercepted merely 80 miles away from the ship, said Navy officials.

    Lt. Cmdr. Nicole Schwegman described the incident with the Russian air force on Sunday as “safe and professional,” according to Military.com.

    The Russian Ministry of Defense acknowledged the situation on Monday, claiming the U.S. and Japanese aircrafts escorted their “missile-carrying Tupolev-95MS strategic bombers during their flights over international waters of the Sea of Japan and the Pacific Ocean,” according to TASS news agency.

    “Two strategic bombers Tupolev-95MS of Russia’s Aerospace Force have carried out routine flights over international waters of the Sea of Japan and the western part of the Pacific Ocean,” Russian officials said.

    “At certain sections of the route the Tupolev-95MS crews were accompanied by a pair of F-18 fighters (of the U.S. Air Force), and a pair of F-15, F-4 and F-2A fighters (of the Japanese Air Force).”

    Both Russia and the U.S. have sent their nuclear bomber near North Korea amid increasing tension between the rogue North Korean regime and the U.S. and its allies in the region.

    Last weekend, an U.S. B-2 stealth bomber equipped with nuclear strike capabilities flew over undisclosed parts of the Pacific region ahead of President Trump’s visit to Japan and South Korea.

    The bomber made rounds to “familiarize aircrew with air bases and operations in different geographic combatant commands, enabling them to maintain a high state of readiness and proficiency” and meant to show the “commitment to our allies and enhancing regional security,” according to a U.S. military statement.

    Most incidents involving interception cause little trouble to the forces, but occasionally such incidents can be deemed confrontational.

    Last June, a Russian jet came dangerously close to a U.S. Air Force reconnaissance aircraft, with U.S. officials slamming the encounter as “provocative” in its maneuvers and accused the Russian jet flying “erratically.”




    Air Force Bombers Fly Near Korean Peninsula In Training Mission

    November 2, 2017

    Two B-1B bombers flew near the Korean peninsula on Thursday as part of a previously scheduled operation, the U.S. Air Force confirmed.

    The Air Force, in tangent with Japan Air Self-Defense Force fighters and the Republic of Korea Air Force, conducted a planned, bilateral mission in the area, according to a statement from the Pacific Air Force.

    The two B1-B Lancers reportedly took off from Andersen Air Force Base in Guam and flew south of Korea and west of Japan to join Koku Jietai, or the Japanese fighters. They then flew over the Korean Peninsula to meet with the Korean fighters in the Yellow Sea. After the mission was over, the jets all flew back to their original locations.

    “The bilateral continuous bomber presence (CBP) mission was planned in advance, to include coordination with the JASDF and ROKAF, and was not in response to any current event,” the Pacific Air Force said.

    Earlier Thursday, the North Korean regime acknowledged the flyover and said it was done to “threaten and blackmail” the government, Yonhap News Agency reported.

    The state-run Korean Central News Agency reportedly claimed that the mission was to train for a nuclear strike on North Korea.




    US Bombers From Guam Conduct Exercise Over Korean Peninsula

    November 2, 2017

    Two U.S. supersonic bombers have flown over the Korean Peninsula in bombing exercises that are also a show of force against North Korea ahead of President Donald Trump's first official visit to Asia.

    A South Korean military official said Friday the B-1B bombers flown from Guam were escorted by two South Korean F-16 fighter jets during the drills Thursday at a field near the South's eastern coast. The official did not want to be named, citing office rules.

    North Korea's state media denounced the exercise as a "surprise nuclear strike drill" and says "gangster-like U.S. imperialists" are seeking to ignite a nuclear war.

    The United States has been sending its strategic assets to the region more frequently for patrols or drills as North Korea further advances its nuclear weapons program.

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    Default Re: World War Three Thread....


    Top Marine General: 'There's A War Coming'

    December 22, 2017

    The commandant of the Marine Corps, Gen. Robert Neller, told troops Thursday that "there's a war coming" and urged them to be prepared.

    "I hope I'm wrong, but there's a war coming," Neller told Marines stationed in Norway, during a visit there, according to Military.com. "You're in a fight here, an informational fight, a political fight, by your presence," he added.

    The commandant pointed to Russia and the Pacific theater as the next major areas of conflict, predicting a "big-ass fight" in the future.

    "Just remember why you're here," he said. "They're watching. Just like you watch them, they watch you. We've got 300 Marines up here; we could go from 300 to 3,000 overnight. We could raise the bar."

    Neller's visit comes amid tensions between Russia and NATO allies. Russia warned neighboring Norway that the presence of American troops could hurt relations, after Norway decision to host a new unit of U.S. soldiers through the end of 2018.

    The administration says the Marines are there to enhance ties with European NATO allies and train in cold-weather combat.

    In a question-and-answer session with the troops, Neller said the U.S. could shift its focus after years of fighting in the Middle East to Eastern Europe, citing Russia's conflicts with Ukraine and Georgia.

    On Monday, President Trump unveiled a new national security strategy that focused on the threats posed by Russia and China to U.S. interests.



    Marine Leaders Highlight Norway Unit's Role as Deterrent to Russia

    December 21, 2017

    The stated goals of the Marine Corps' newest rotational force in Norway are to enhance partnerships with European allies and improve the service's ability to fight in cold weather.

    But on a brief visit to the 300-member unit ahead of Christmas, the commandant and the sergeant major of the Marine Corps both described the strategic role the small unit fills -- and the fact that a peacetime mission can be preface to combat if circumstances change.

    The Norwegian Home Guard base near Trondheim that houses the Marine rotational force was the first stop on Gen. Robert Neller's annual Christmas tour.

    The stop was a new one for the tour. The first Norway rotation, from 1st Battalion, 2nd Marines, deployed in January and was replaced by a new unit from 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marines, in late August.

    Neller emphasized to the Marines that they should remain ready to fight at all times, predicting a "big-ass fight" on the horizon.

    "I hope I'm wrong, but there's a war coming," Neller said. " ... You're in a fight here, an informational fight, a political fight, by your presence."

    Neller later told the Marines that he expects the Pacific and Russia to be the service's operational points of focus as the nation looks beyond the fights in the Middle East that have stretched into the better part of two decades.

    The United States' position that Russia presents a major threat was re-emphasized in the new National Security Strategy released Monday. The document discusses Russia's practice of "using information tools" to interfere with other nations' democracies and militant aggression that crosses borders.


    "With its invasions of Georgia and Ukraine, Russia demonstrates its willingness to violate the sovereignty of states in the region," the strategy states.

    Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps Ronald Green put the Marines' role starkly.

    "Just remember why you're here," he said. "They're watching. Just like you watch them, they watch you. We've got 300 Marines up here; we could go from 300 to 3,000 overnight. We could raise the bar."

    The rotational force itself is much more circumspect about its role in the region. On a visit to the unit in May, Military.com found troops assigned to the unit had even been instructed not to use the word "Russia" in interviews with the media.

    In large part, this is due to regional sensitivities.

    The rotational unit is in Norway at the invitation of the Norwegian government, which maintains an economic relationship with Russia and shares a 120-mile border on its northeastern edge with the country.

    While Norwegian feedback on the Marines' presence has been generally positive -- then-Norwegian Defense Minister Ina Eriksen Søreide announced in June that the rotation had been extended for a year, until 2018 -- others have cited misgivings.

    In October, Norway opposition leaders asked Prime Minister Erna Solberg to explain exactly what the American troops are doing in the country.

    Russian officials, for their part, have been outspoken in opposing the presence of Marines in Norway and warning of diplomatic repercussions.


    Though Green did not name Russia, he referred to its displeasure at the Marines' presence nearby.

    "They don't like the fact that we oppose them, and we like the fact that they don't like the fact that we oppose them," Green said. "Three hundred of us, surrounded by them, we've got them right where we wanted, right? We've done this before."

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    Default Re: World War Three Thread....

    I'm not really seeing anything from the Russians these days. I don't think they are trying to be in conflict with us. They just want what they want. lol
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    Default Re: World War Three Thread....


    China and Russia Train For War With U.S. If Trump Invades North Korea

    December 18, 2017

    China and Russia may be devising a plan to attack U.S. forces in the event of an imminent war breaking out on the neighboring Korean Peninsula, according to two former military officials.

    Lieutenant General Wang Hongguang, the former deputy commander of the western Nanjing Military Region, warned "the war on the Korean Peninsula might break out anytime between now and March next year"; his comments came during a conference hosted Saturday by ruling Communist Party newspaper The Global Times. The following day, the nationalist outlet expanded on the retired general's remarks with insight from Chinese military expert, commentator and author Song Zhongping, who said China could potentially engage U.S. forces if they posed a threat.

    "China should be psychologically prepared for a potential Korean war, and the Northeast China regions should be mobilized for that," Wang said Saturday, according to The Global Times. "Such mobilization is not to launch a war, but for defensive purposes."

    Song, himself a former member of the Chinese military's Second Artillery Corps, which was later transformed into the Rocket Force, told The Global Times on Sunday that such "defensive purposes" would likely include contingency plans to retaliate against any breach of Chinese sovereignty by invading U.S. forces.


    Soldiers assigned to an air assault brigade of the 83rd Group Army under the People's Liberation Army Central Theater Command drive "leopard cat" all-terrain assault vehicles to engage in combat with simulated enemies under fire support by helicopters during an assault, capture and control training exercise at a field training ground in the hinterland of China's Taihang mountains on December 16.


    In a separate interview, Song also said that high-tech anti-missile drills held that same day by China and Russia in Beijing were actually a joint effort by the U.S.'s two leading military competitors to defend against a potential attack order by President Donald Trump, who has increasingly feuded with North Korean supreme leader Kim Jong Un since taking office in January. Both China and Russia have joined the U.S. in condemning North Korea's nuclear and ballistic weapons arsenal, which the country argued was necessary to defend against a U.S. attempt to overthrow Kim, but Beijing and Moscow have staunchly opposed an expansionist U.S. military in the Asia-Pacific.

    "The main target of the joint drills between China and Russia is the U.S., which has both ballistic and cruise missiles that could pose a real threat to both Beijing and Moscow," Song told the South China Morning Post on Sunday.

    "Both China and Russia wanted to use these joint anti-missile drills for strategic deterrence. They want to push the U.S. to withdraw its Terminal High Altitude Area Defence (THAAD) from the Korean peninsula," he added.

    The U.S's THAAD anti-missile system became fully operational in South Korea earlier this year. The Pentagon has argued such missile defense is necessary to shield the U.S. ally from a potential missile attack by its northern rival, but China and Russia have criticized the apparatus for apparently undermining their own national security. As Trump's stance toward North Korea grew more militant, the U.S. leader has sent more military assets and has conducted more drills in the tense region, further infuriating China and Russia.


    Chinese armed police and Russian national guards take part in a joint counterterrorism drill in Yinchuan, Ningxia Hui autonomous region, China, on December 5. The leading military competitors to the U.S. have been growing closer in recent years and seek to limit Washington's influence abroad.


    China and Russia previously backed North Korea when the newly-established communist state went to war with South Korea, supported by the U.S. and U.N., in the early 1950s. The three-year battle, widely seen as the first clash of the Cold War, ended with an armistice establishing a demilitarized zone (DMZ) roughly along the pre-war border, but no peace between the warring neighbors.

    While Kim continued to expand his U.N.-sanctioned arsenal inherited by his father and grandfather, Chinese President Xi Jinping and Russian President Vladimir Putin have both undergone their own historic initiatives to expand their military and political power across the globe. In Trump's "America first" national security strategy announced Monday, he denounced Kim's nuclear-armed "rogue regime," as well as China and Russia's attempts to "challenge American power, influence and interests, attempting to erode American security and prosperity."

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