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Thread: The Turkey-Russia-Iran Axis

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    Default The Turkey-Russia-Iran Axis

    Quote Originally Posted by vector7 View Post
    Incirlik Nukes Out, Russian Air Force In. Is Turkey Leaving NATO?



    Published on Aug 19, 2016

    SHOW NOTES AND MP3: https://www.corbettreport.com/?p=19624

    In a bombshell development, Turkey and Russia are considering military ties and even floating the idea of opening Incirlik to the Russian Air Force. Is Turkey preparing to exit NATO? Or pushing to see how far they can take their alliance with Russia? Or about to be pushed out? And what does it mean if they are? Are the Incirlik nukes in play? And what about Turkey's role in Syria? Join us today for a fascinating edition of the Newsbud roundtable as Sibel Edmonds, James Corbett and Spiro Skouras dissect the latest developments in one of the world's most volatile regions.

    The Turkey-Russia-Iran Axis

    Dramatic developments alter the strategic balance in the Middle East.

    August 22, 2016
    Kenneth R. Timmerman



    A techtonic shift has occurred in the balance of power in the Middle East since the failed Turkish coup of mid-July, and virtually no one in Washington is paying attention to it.

    Turkey and Iran are simultaneously moving toward Russia, while Russia is expanding its global military and strategic reach, all to the detriment of the United States and our allies. This will have a major impact across the region, potentially leaving U.S. ally Israel isolated to face a massive hostile alliance armed with nuclear weapons.

    Believers in Bible prophecy see this new alignment as a step closer to the alliance mentioned in Ezekiel 37-38, which Israel ultimately defeated on the plains of Megiddo.

    Today’s Israel, however, is doing its best to soften the blow by patching up relations with Turkey and through cooperation with Russia.
    Here are some of the moves and countermoves that have been taking place in recent weeks on a giant three-dimensional chessboard with multiple players and opponents.

    Russia-Turkey: It now appears that Russian intelligence tipped off Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan just hours before the planned coup against his regime. When the coup plotters got wind of the Russian communications with Erdogan loyalists at the National Intelligence Organization (MIT), they moved up the coup from the dead of night to 9 PM, when the streets were packed.

    For Erdogan, the Russian warning came just in the nick of time, allowing him to flee his hotel in Marmaris minutes before twenty-five special forces troops loyal to the coup-plotters roped down from the roof of his hotel to seize him.

    With streets in Istanbul full of people, Erdogan’s text and video messages calling on supporters to oppose the coup had maximum impact.
    After purging the military and government of suspected enemies, Erdogan’s first foreign trip was to Russia, where on August 8 he thanked Putin for his help. “The Moscow-Ankara friendship axis will be restored,” he proclaimed.

    Two days later, Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu blasted NATO for its “evasive fashion” of responding to Turkish requests for military technology transfers, and opened the door to joint military production with Russia.

    Cavosoglu accused NATO of considering Turkey and Russia “to be second class countries,” and pointed out that Turkey was the only NATO country that was refusing to impose sanctions on Russia for its annexation of the Crimea and invasion of Ukraine.

    Russia has also been in talks with Turkey to base Russian warplanes at the NATO air base in Incirlik, Turkey, where some 2400 U.S. personnel have been quarantined since the failed July 15 coup attempt as Turkey continues to demand that the U.S. extradite alleged coup-plotter Fethullah Gulen, who lives in Pennsylvania.

    These talks have alarmed the Pentagon, which on Thursday reportedly ordered the emergency evacuation to Romania of the estimated 50-70 nuclear B-61 “dial-a-yield” gravity bombs stockpiled at the base.

    If confirmed, the nuclear withdrawal from Turkey constitutes a major strategic setback for the United States, with Russia poised to replace the United States as Turkey’s main military partner after 60 years of NATO cooperation.

    Russia-Iran: The warming of the Russia-Turkey relationship comes as Russia simultaneously is making advances in Iran.

    The two countries have a long and often troubled history. The 1921 Soviet-Iranian treaty, which ended long-standing tsarist concessions in Iran, also included a mutual defense pact. Triggered briefly during World War II, the Soviets seized the opportunity to foment a Communist coup in Iranian Azerbaijan in 1948 and only withdrew after President Truman threatened to use nuclear weapons.

    Successive Iranian regimes remained suspicious of Soviet intentions for the rest of the Cold War.

    In recent years, Iran and Russia have joined together to evade international sanctions, with Russian banks clearing payments for Iranian oil purchases and serving as a conduit for Iranian government purchases abroad.

    Last week, the specter of the 1921 defense treaty suddenly came alive when the Russia and Iran announced they had signed a new military agreement to allow Russian jets to use the Nojeh airbase in western Iran for attacks on Syrian rebels.

    This is the first time that the Islamic regime in Iran has allowed a foreign power to use Iranian territory as a base for offensive military operations against another country in the region, and the move lead to tensions in the Iranian parliament.

    For Russia, the move dramatically reduced flight times for the Tu-22M3 Backfire bombers it had been flying against ISIS targets in Syria from Mozdok airbase in Ossetia, 2000 km away. Iran’s Nojeh air base, outside Hamadan, is less than 900 km from the war zone.

    The shorter flight times also meant shorter warning for the Syrian rebels. Russian media reports have alleged that the United States has been providing “satellite surveillance data” to the Syrian rebels of the Russian bombing runs, allowing them to disperse “suspiciously too often” before the heavy bombers arrived on target from Mozdok.

    The shorter distance cuts the flight time – and thus the warning time – by 60%, according to former Pentagon official Stephen D. Bryen. “The flight from Iran is between 30 to 45 minutes tops. If, therefore, the US is warning the rebels of impending Russian air strikes, the time to get the message to them and to actually be able to move their forces out of harms way, is far less and maybe too short for finding effective cover,”

    Bryen wrote in a recent blogpost.


    Conclusion: Russia is on the verge of realizing a multi-generational dream of reaching the “warm waters” of the Persian Gulf through Iran.

    Iran-Iraq: Adding to these dramatic developments was the announcement last week by a U.S. military spokesman, Colonel Chris Garver, that Iran now controls a military force of 100,000 armed fighters in neighboring Iraq. While the United States has allowed this Iranian expansion under the pretext Iran was helping in the fight against ISIS, clearly Iran can use this massive organized force to exercise its control over Iraq as well.

    While none of these events was directly caused by the United States, clearly the lack of U.S. leadership emboldened our enemies, whose leaders have a much clearer strategic vision than ours of where they want the region to go.

    Meanwhile, the Russian government continues to pursue the massive ten-year, $650 billion military modernization program that Putin announced in December 2010, despite reduced oil revenues. Those plans include eight new nuclear submarines, 600 new fighter jets, 1000 helicopters, as well as new tanks and other ground equipment.

    Most of the new equipment is based on new designs incorporating advanced technologies, not existing weapons systems.

    Just this week, U.S. intelligence officials reported ongoing construction of “dozens’ of underground nuclear command bunkers in Moscow and around the country apparently for use in the event of a nuclear wear. General Curtis Scaparrotti, commander of U.S. European Command, called Russia’s evolving doctrine on the first use of nuclear weapons “alarming.”

    All of this does not mean that the United States and Russia are headed toward a direct confrontation. The more likely consequence, given the sweeping Russian powerplay with Turkey and Iran, is that the United States will simply abandon the region to Putin’s Russia and his Turkish and Iranian allies.

    The consequence of that abandon will undoubtedly motivate Saudi Arabia to develop nuclear weapons as a counterweight to Iran.
    Nero fiddled as Rome burned. Obama plays golf. Both leaders will leave ashes in their wake.

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    Default Re: The Turkey-Russia-Iran Axis

    Seeing Turkey move from its traditionally mostly secular government toward a more Islamist-influenced gov't the last many years, and considering how they've gotten closer to Russia I'm surmising that they may be entertaining notions of being the head of some sort of reconstituted Ottoman Empire allied to Russia and the rest of the TAA/SCO countries.

    I don't know if them bailing on NATO will cause the break-up of the organization, but it will definitely shake it to its core.

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    Default Re: The Turkey-Russia-Iran Axis

    Quote Originally Posted by Brutus View Post
    Seeing Turkey move from its traditionally mostly secular government toward a more Islamist-influenced gov't the last many years, and considering how they've gotten closer to Russia I'm surmising that they may be entertaining notions of being the head of some sort of reconstituted Ottoman Empire allied to Russia and the rest of the TAA/SCO countries.

    I don't know if them bailing on NATO will cause the break-up of the organization, but it will definitely shake it to its core.
    All I can say is that I'm glad I visited Turkey when I did. I have no interest in going now.
    "Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs even though checkered by failure, than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy nor suffer much because they live in the gray twilight that knows neither victory nor defeat."
    -- Theodore Roosevelt


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    Default Re: The Turkey-Russia-Iran Axis

    Quote Originally Posted by Brutus View Post
    Seeing Turkey move from its traditionally mostly secular government toward a more Islamist-influenced gov't the last many years, and considering how they've gotten closer to Russia I'm surmising that they may be entertaining notions of being the head of some sort of reconstituted Ottoman Empire allied to Russia and the rest of the TAA/SCO countries.

    I don't know if them bailing on NATO will cause the break-up of the organization, but it will definitely shake it to its core.
    Hi Brutus!

    I've been wary of how Trump is going to treat NATO from stuff he's said on the campaign trail but personally I think NATO could use a shakeup. Turkey should most definitely be dismissed as a member and we should be focused on being stronger partners with Poland, especially, but the other Baltic states as well.

    England and Germany need to start pulling their weight for sure. For a country like England to have a navy with no missile platforms is pathetic.

    And ideally I'd like to see NATO reshaped into something larger than just the North Atlantic, bringing Australia and Japan into the fold. Both have proven to be strong allies and there should be a mechanism to more fully integrate their defense capabilities than just being partnered with us.

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    Default Re: The Turkey-Russia-Iran Axis

    I've often thought that our defense *AND* trade policy should be along the lines of "free trade/mutual defense with free countries."

    This would include most of Europe, Israel, Japan, SKorea, Taiwan, Australia and New Zealand, etc.

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    Default Re: The Turkey-Russia-Iran Axis

    Yes, most definitely. And good point about the others I left out!

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    Default Re: The Turkey-Russia-Iran Axis


    Turkey, Russia Sign Deal On Supply Of S-400 Missiles

    December 28, 2017

    Turkey and Russia on Friday signed an accord for Moscow to supply Ankara with S-400 surface-to-air missile batteries, Turkish authorities said, finalizing a deal set to deepen military ties between NATO member Turkey and the Kremlin.

    The S-400 deal, reportedly worth some $2.5 billion and in the works for more than a year, has worried the West because the system cannot be integrated into NATO's military architecture.

    As part of NATO's collective defense pledge, the allies integrate their ships, planes and weapons systems to make them work together, as well as sharing command across the alliance.

    The accord is the latest in a series of moves by Ankara to boost its defense capabilities as it faces threats from Kurdish and Islamist militants at home and conflicts across its borders in Syria and Iraq.

    In a statement late on Friday, Turkey's Undersecretariat for Defence Industries (SSM) said that Moscow would supply the S-400 missile batteries to Ankara in an initial delivery planned for the first quarter of 2020.

    On Wednesday, Sergei Chemezov, head of the Russian state conglomerate Rostec, told the Kommersant daily that Russia would supply Turkey with four batteries of S-400s under the deal.

    However, the SSM said Turkey would buy two S-400 batteries from Russia under the agreement, with one being optional, and added the systems would be used and managed "independently" by Turkish personnel, rather than Russian advisors.

    It said the Turkish Armed Forces (TSK) would have full control over the systems, and added that the accord signed earlier on Friday included clauses on cooperation for technologic gains and joint development.

    Turkey's purchase of the systems has unnerved NATO member countries, who are already wary of Moscow's military presence in the Middle East, as the system is incompatible with the alliance's systems.

    NATO officials have warned Turkey about unspecified consequences of purchasing the S-400, but Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan has said ties with NATO remain strong.

    Chezmezov said Moscow was expected to begin the first deliveries in March 2020 and that Turkey was the first NATO member state to acquire the advanced S-400 missile system.

    Earlier on Friday, Turkish newspapers cited Erdogan as saying Turkey would borrow in the Russian currency in a loan deal under the accord.

    BORROWING "IN RUBLES"

    "We will not borrow in dollars in this loan, we will borrow in rubles," Hurriyet newspaper quoted Erdogan as telling reporters on his plane, returning from a trip to Africa.

    According to Chemezov, Turkey would pay 45 percent of the cost of the agreement up front, with Russia providing loans to cover the remaining 55 percent.

    The Russian Finance Ministry will finance a deal from the state treasury, while Russian banks will take part solely in the transfer of funds in the deal, a Russian banking source said.

    Relations between Moscow and Ankara deteriorated sharply in 2015 after Turkey shot down a Russian air force jet that it said had crossed into Turkish airspace, but they have since repaired ties despite having backed different sides in the Syrian war.

    They are now cooperating on Syrian peace efforts as well as projects in the defense industry and energy sectors.

    While pushing ahead with the S-400 project, Ankara has sought to secure defense deals with other countries as well.

    In November, Turkey signed a letter of intent with France and Italy to strengthen cooperation on joint defense projects. As a first step, the Franco-Italian EUROSAM consortium and Turkish companies will look into a system based on the SAMP-T missile systems.

    Turkey has also invested heavily in the development of its domestic defense industry, with projects encompassing areas including combat helicopters, tanks, drones and warships.

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