Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Obama Administration NSA Spying on Americans

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Re: Obama Administration Spying on Americans (NSA)

    Ex-NSA Expert: Common Security Camera Systems Can be Easily Hacked to Spy on You

    Jun. 18, 2013 8:40am Liz Klimas

    (Photo: Shutterstock.com)



    Like a scene from an action film, a former NSA software developer is saying he has identified how major camera systems could be hacked to freeze a frame and allow nefarious activity to take place without being seen on the feed.


    Craig Heffner, who now works with Tactical Network Solutions in Maryland, is planning to demonstrate how the camera systems in many sensitive facilities — prisons, banks, military bases, etc. — are vulnerable to hacking, according to Reuters.


    The digital video systems that could be compromised include those by big names like Cisco Systems Inc, D-Link Corp and TRENDnet. The hack is done through the public Internet and is one where the perpetrator would be able to keep the frame on a certain image or could spy through it.


    “It’s a significant threat,” he told Reuters. “Somebody could potentially access a camera and view it. Or they could also use it as a pivot point, an initial foothold, to get into the network and start attacking internal systems.”


    Heffner will present his findings at the Black Hat hacker conference, which begins July 31 in Las Vegas and has Gen. Keith Alexander, the head of the NSA, as its keynote speaker. He said he doesn’t plan on revealing the vulnerabilities to the companies ahead of the conference, but all the companies have expressed that they’ll stay tuned to make any necessary fixes.


    In addition to camera hacks that could be tricking security crews into missing what’s really going on by skewing the feed, TheBlaze has previously reported on hackers being able to peer into homes and businesses with unsecured cameras. TRENDnet had a coding issue that was posting a video feed on the Internet in 2012, which it then released firmware update to fix.


    Laptop cameras are also vulnerable to hacking as well through a technique using RATs (remote administration tools), which give hackers complete control of your computer, including turning cameras on and off to spy on users.
    Libertatem Prius!

    sigpic


    Comment


    • Re: Obama Administration Spying on Americans (NSA)

      NSA head says 50 attacks have been prevented since 9-11. The focus is STILL on the authorized use of the Patriot Act under section 702. It does not address the other means of gathering claimed and not actually disputed. This is serious spin. Even the NSA head said Snowden's release supports what he is saying and that is not untrue, but incomplete.

      Comment


      • Re: Obama Administration Spying on Americans (NSA)

        My issue is and will remain the vacuum cleaner collection, storage of data and the FUTURE POSSIBLE ABUSE by ANY Administration. I don't want ANYONE abusing it.

        And when you have all three branches of the government who are all acting in unison, ignoring the rights of the PEOPLE of this country it could happen no matter who is in charge.

        Damn it.
        Libertatem Prius!

        sigpic


        Comment


        • Re: Obama Administration Spying on Americans (NSA)

          "We won't know for eight months if the leaks affected things....."

          Wow.
          Libertatem Prius!

          sigpic


          Comment


          • Re: Obama Administration Spying on Americans (NSA)

            The vacuum is my issue as well. They are not addressing that so much as the "702 authority" thing.

            It was a long time ago I became fully aware of the trade of Freedom for Security and champion freedoms over security as there can be a reasonable balance. Having this vacuum did not prevent Boston or Fort Hood. That was an example I heard on the radio today, but then I thought about it. These are examples of Muslim related attacks when the executive branch says Muslims are not the enemy. Perhaps not every Muslim, but it seems very clear the radical element to that faith is indeed all out to kill us all.

            Comment


            • Re: Obama Administration Spying on Americans (NSA)

              When the Patriot Act was created... most of us were still naive enough to think we should "trust the government". They wouldn't do anything to undermine the CONSTITUTION, right?

              Wrong.

              They did. They have. They are going ahead with it.

              It has to stop someplace.

              The fact is we should NOT trust the government, even if we work IN IT, (especially if) because they will do everything they can (Congress, Presidents, the SCOTUS) to undermine our rights guaranteed (NOT GRANTED) by the Constitution.

              Many people wrongly believe that the Constitution GRANTS us rights. It doesn't. It merely AFFIRMS those rights as ours, and NOT the Government's!

              This shit has to stop.

              The excuse that they will lose some tool is just that, a BS excuse because they could do without that by using what they had before.

              Collecting 5 years of data is more bullshit. I KNOW better. I WORK in the field. I KNOW we keep crap MORE than the required TWO years (Two years in mandated on most things, and the NSA/CIA whomever gets FIVE YEARS? More obfuscation and bullshit).
              Libertatem Prius!

              sigpic


              Comment


              • Re: Obama Administration Spying on Americans (NSA)

                Phil, I think ALL Muslims are a problem.

                Sorry, call me racist or bigotted, or a White Mofo... I don't care. ALL OF them are a problem if they are studying the same bloody book that calls for killing "Infidels".

                If a religion, regardless of whose religion it is calls for the deaths of "non believers" in that religion, then it's time to take them apart piece by piece. They want to be called the religion of peace when they are really the religion of pieces.
                Libertatem Prius!

                sigpic


                Comment


                • Re: Obama Administration Spying on Americans (NSA)

                  The only reason I make an exception is there are some who do not take what the koran says as literal as others. One of my managers is from Indonesia and pretty much does what some Catholics do. For her, she may sin but pray about it later. For some Catholics, they may sin and go to confession. I am very careful about blanket labeling but understand the desire.

                  Comment


                  • Re: Obama Administration Spying on Americans (NSA)

                    NORMALLY I would be too. I've seen too many things lately, and heard too many people lately who are die hards and think that all of us are Infidels because we don't believe THEIR way. I'm not going to, either. So they can kiss my ass. If they get in my face, I'll get right back.
                    Libertatem Prius!

                    sigpic


                    Comment


                    • Re: Obama Administration Spying on Americans (NSA)

                      N.S.A. Chief Says Surveillance Has Stopped Dozens of Plots




                      Christopher Gregory/The New York Times
                      N.S.A. Chief Testfies on Surveillance: At a House Intelligence Committee hearing on Tuesday, Gen. Keith B. Alexander described how American surveillance programs helped thwart dozens of terror plots.


                      By CHARLIE SAVAGE

                      Published: June 18, 2013

                      • Facebook
                      • Twitter
                      • Google+
                      • Save
                      • E-mail
                      • Share
                      • Print
                      • Reprints



                      WASHINGTON — Gen. Keith B. Alexander, the head of the National Security Agency, said on Tuesday that American surveillance had helped prevent “potential terrorist events over 50 times since 9/11,” including at least 10 “homeland-based threats.” But he said that a vast majority must remain secret to avoid disclosing sources and methods.

                      Related



                      Enlarge This Image

                      Christopher Gregory/The New York Times

                      Gen. Keith B. Alexander, director of the National Security Agency, testified before the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence on Tuesday.




                      “These programs are immensely valuable for protecting our nation and securing the security of our allies,” General Alexander said at a rare public oversight hearing by the House Intelligence Committee.


                      In addition, the deputy director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Sean Joyce, listed two newly disclosed cases that have now been declassified in an effort to respond to the leaking of classified information about surveillance by Edward J. Snowden, a former N.S.A. contractor.


                      Mr. Joyce described a plot to blow up the New York Stock Exchange by a Kansas City man, whom the agency was able to identify because he was in contact with “an extremist” in Yemen who was under surveillance. Mr. Joyce also talked about a San Diego man who planned to send financial support to a terrorist group in Somalia, and who was identified because the N.S.A. flagged his phone number as suspicious through its database of all domestic phone call logs, which was brought to light by Mr. Snowden’s disclosures.


                      “As Americans, we value our privacy and our civil liberties,” General Alexander said. “As Americans, we also value our security and our safety. In the 12 years since the attacks on Sept. 11, we have lived in relative safety and security as a nation. That security is a direct result of the intelligence community’s quiet efforts to better connect the dots and learn from the mistakes that permitted those attacks to occur in 9/11.”


                      The nonadversarial tone of the oversight hearing was captured by its title: How Disclosed N.S.A. Programs Protect Americans, and Why Disclosure Aids Our Adversaries. Both the top Republican and the top Democrat on the committee, Representatives Mike Rogers of Michigan and C. A. Dutch Ruppersburger of Maryland, offered a robust defense of the surveillance programs revealed by Mr. Snowden and expressed anger over the leaks, and all five witnesses were executive branch officials who supported the surveillance activities.


                      In an apparent reference to Mr. Snowden, for example, Mr. Rogers criticized his actions as “selectively leaking incomplete information” that “paints an inaccurate picture and fosters distrust in our government.” He added, “It is at times like these where our enemies within become almost as damaging as our enemies on the outside.”
                      There was no way to independently verify the claims made by the officials during the hearing.


                      The director of national intelligence, James R. Clapper Jr., testified at a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing in March that the N.S.A. did not collect records on hundreds of millions of Americans. Since the revelation of the phone log database, he has explained that his testimony was the “least untruthful” statement he could make about a classified program.


                      The testimony on Tuesday focused on two programs: the collection of the content of e-mails and phone calls of noncitizens abroad who were targeted by the agency without individual court orders under Section 702 of the FISA Amendments Act, and the maintenance of a huge database of domestic phone logs that has been compiled under Section 215 of the Patriot Act.


                      Both programs are used to try to identify any co-conspirators of terrorism suspects. In recent days, intelligence officials and lawmakers have been disclosing details about safeguards built into the systems, including that the phone logs are destroyed after five years and that fewer than 300 terrorism-related numbers were approved for searching in 2012.


                      The witnesses clarified other details on Tuesday. James M. Cole, the deputy attorney general, said that while the 702 program can capture the contents of e-mails and phone calls when an overseas target communicates with people in the United States, if officials then want to eavesdrop on purely domestic phone calls or e-mails by anyone in the ring of acquaintances of the overseas target, they must get an individualized warrant from a court.


                      “If they make a call to inside the United States, that can be collected, but it’s only because the target of that call outside the United States initiated that call and went there,” he said. “If the calls are wholly within the United States, we cannot collect them. If you’re targeting a person who is outside of the United States and you find that they come into the United States, we have to stop the targeting right away.”


                      In addition, General Alexander said that every query to the domestic phone log database was audited by supervisors, and that so far there had been no willful abuses or discipline carried out. And his deputy, John C. Inglis, said that under court orders, “only 20 analysts at N.S.A. and their two managers, for a total of 22 people, are authorized to approve numbers that may be used to query this database.”


                      In a rare note of skepticism, Representative Adam B. Schiff, Democrat of California, pressed General Alexander about why the F.B.I. could not use subpoenas to get the necessary domestic phone logs surrounding a suspicious number without the government’s obtaining logs of everyone’s calls. General Alexander said he was open to discussion, but added, “The concern is speed in a crisis.”
                      Libertatem Prius!

                      sigpic


                      Comment


                      • Re: Obama Administration Spying on Americans (NSA)

                        When a hearing is loaded for an engineered result, it will get that result. None there were skeptical of the programs, so it was nothing more than for show and public opinion handling.

                        Comment


                        • Re: Obama Administration Spying on Americans (NSA)

                          Public show for government mishandling you mean?
                          Libertatem Prius!

                          sigpic


                          Comment


                          • Re: Obama Administration Spying on Americans (NSA)

                            NSA Hearing By the Numbers

                            By Kim Zetter
                            06.18.13
                            3:00 PM

                            Follow @KimZetter

                            Director of the National Security Agency (NSA), Gen. Keith B. Alexander, testifies about NSA surveillance before the Senate Appropriations Committee on Capitol Hill. Photo: Charles Dharapak/AP

                            A federal hearing today on NSA surveillance programs leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden produced some interesting numbers about the scope of the data collections and other issues. We’ve produced a roundup below of some of the interesting stats and intelligence gleaned from the discussion.

                            The hearing, before Congress’s Select Committee on Intelligence, included NSA Director, General Keith Alexander; Deputy Attorney General James Cole; Deputy Director of the FBI Sean Joyce; and General Counsel Robert Litt, from the Office of the Director of National Intelligence General Counsel.

                            1) NSA Only Uses Section 215 of Patriot Act to Obtain Phone records. NSA Director Keith Alexander, responding to questions about the kinds of business records the agency obtains using this power granted by the Patriot Act, said that the agency only uses it to obtain phone records from companies. This would seem to contradict a recent Wall Street Journal story, which disclosed that the agency was collecting credit card transactions. But Alexander’s statement doesn’t rule out that the FBI is collecting credit card transactions and providing data pertaining to foreign intelligence cases to the NSA. The vast majority of business records requests under Section 215 are done by the FBI and other federal agencies, not the NSA.

                            2) Phone Records Obtained by NSA under Section 215 Are Destroyed After 5 Years. ODNI General Counsel Robert Litt asserted that the records are not kept indefinitely. Nor are they used for general data mining and pattern analysis, according to Alexander. He stated that the records are only used to perform individual “queries” against specific phone numbers. Presumably this means that pattern analysis likely would be done on those targeted phone numbers that are under investigation in order to ascertain any and all phone numbers that have communicated with the targeted number.

                            3) Only 22 People at NSA Can Authorize Queries of Phone Records Database. This number includes 20 analysts and two supervisors. Among the 22 people who can authorize such queries of the phone records database are Gen. Alexander himself and Litt.

                            4) Records/Data Obtained under 215 and Section 702 of FISA Thwarted 50 Potential Terrorist Plots. NSA Director Alexander and FBI Deputy Director Sean Joyce said that at least 50 cases they investigated used data obtained under the two surveillance programs that Snowden exposed. Section 702 of FISA can cover real-time emails and chats, IP addresses and other data. Asked by Rep. Jim Himes (D-Connecticut), how many of these 50 episodes “would have occurred but for your ability to use 702″ (or “How essential are these authorizations to stopping these attacks?”), Alexander said that he believed that in at least half of these cases, the data obtained under Section 702 of FISA was “critical.” He said that of the cases involving the use of phone records obtained under Section 215 of the Patriot Act, a little more than 10 of these cases involved some kind of “domestic nexus” — meaning they involved a U.S. citizen overseas or in the U.S. The vast majority of these cases “had a contribution from the business records requests.”

                            5) Snowden Worked for the NSA for 15 Months at Time of Leaks. Although it’s been reported that Snowden had only been working for defense contractor Booz Allen Hamilton for three months at the time of the leaks, and had only been stationed at the NSA’s Hawaii facility a few weeks pior to leaking, Alexander noted that Snowden had actually been working for the NSA under a different contractor during the 12 months prior to moving to Booz Allen Hamilton, which would have given him more time to scope out the network and determine which data he wanted to take.

                            6) NSA Plans to Institute a Two-Person Rule to Govern Activities of SysAdmins This would presumably involve requiring a shadow for every sysadmin to ensure that no one operator can download the kind of data Snowden obtained without authorization from another operator, or change auditing and logging instructions on the system to hide their tracks. Alexander noted that Snowden, as a systems administrator, had great authority to access parts of the network that are not accessible to regular analysts. The sysadmin also has the ability to set the auditing conditions on a portion of the network. “This is a huge problem,” Alexander said. “We’re coming up with a two-person rule to make sure we have a way to block” someone from taking information out of the system. “This is a work in progress,” he said.

                            7) NSA Has About 1,000 SysAdmins Worldwide. Alexander said the NSA has about 1,000 system administrators that have, in certain sections, the level of authority comparable to what Snowden had to access data. This number seems small, and Alexander said they were working on trying to get a more exact figure, but he noted that the majority of these system administrators were contract workers.

                            Finally, something else of note that Alexander said in the hearing today. The NSA apparently doesn’t yet know how Snowden obtained access to the court order that authorized Verizon to hand over the phone records of millions of American customers. He noted that to access the kind of data collected under the program required special “certificates” or keys to gain physical access to areas where the data was stored.

                            “To get to any data like business records under 215, that’s in controlled area,” Alexander said. “You need specific certificates to get in to that. I’m not aware that Snowden had any certificates to get into that.” He later noted that by “certificates” he meant keys, meaning presumably electronic door access keys.

                            “In this case, what the system administrator had access to is what we’ll call the public web forums that NSA operates, and these are the things that talk about how we do our business, not necessarily what’s being collected as a results of that,” Alexander said. “Nor does it necessarily give them the insights that the training and the other issues that training and certification process and accreditation that our folks go through to actually do this. So those are in separate programs and require other certificates to get into.”

                            When asked if this meant Snowden did not have the certificates necessary to leave that public forum, Alexander replied, “So each set of data that we would have, and in this case let’s say the business records, FISA, you have to have specific certificates … because this is a cordoned off, so that would be extremely difficult for him to. . . he’d have to get up to NSA and get into that room to do. Others require certificates for you to be working in this area to have that. He would have to get one of those certificates to actually enter that area…. In other words, it’s a key.”

                            Following the hearing, reporters in the room cornered Alexander for further explanation about this, during which Alexander reportedly said that the NSA believes Snowden obtained access to the court order while he was undergoing orientation and training at the NSA’s headquarters at Ft. Meade.

                            “The FISA warrant was on a web server that he had access to as an analyst coming into the Threat Operations Center,” Alexander told Politico. “It was in a special classified section that as he was getting his training he went to.”
                            Libertatem Prius!

                            sigpic


                            Comment


                            • Re: Obama Administration Spying on Americans (NSA)

                              Yes, Rick. Mishandling.

                              Comment


                              • Re: Obama Administration Spying on Americans (NSA)

                                on reddit at http://www.reddit.com/r/picrequests/...enix_in_china/

                                This was created from a request for Snowden in China with a Phoenix.

                                Click image for larger version

Name:	pofn0w1.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	356.9 KB
ID:	205613

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X